This work by George L. K. Morris is a bright abstraction with red, brown and black shapes on a blue background

George L. K. Morris

American, 1905–1975

Precision-Bombing, 1944

Oil on canvas

27 x 33 inches

Signed lower right; signed, titled and dated on the reverse

Morris devoted his career to avant-garde painting and sculpture. After studying with Kenneth Hayes Miller and John Sloan at the Art Students League in New York, he traveled to Paris in 1929 and 1930, where he became immersed in studying abstraction. By the mid-1930s his work bore almost no traces of figuration. Together with A. E. Gallatin, Charles Green Shaw, and Suzy Freylinghuysen, Morris became part of a group known as the “Park Avenue Cubists,” based on their shared artistic style and similar social status.

During World War II Morris strove to convey the urgency of the conflict in his own abstract idiom. His wartime works use recognizable elements along with his signature abstraction to create a certain social commentary that he felt was crucial. In Precision-Bombing the asymmetrical grid structure and the fractured elements reflect the upheaval and uncertainty of the period.

This work by George L. K. Morris is a bright abstraction with red, brown and black shapes on a blue background